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Aquila

Additional details on Conservation:

Status by state: The following information was obtained from the websites of the respective state wildlife agencies:

Alabama: Regarded as a species of "Moderate Conservation Concern" (Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources 2009).

California: Classified as a Fully Protected Species of Special Concern (California Department of Fish and Game).

Maine: Classified as Endangered (Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife).

New Hampshire: 12 pairs. Classified as Endangered (New Hampshire Fish and Game Department).

New Jersey: Farmer et al. (2007) found a decrease in various indices of counts of migrating Golden Eagles at Cape May Point, New Jersey between the periods of 1976-78 and 2001-03.

Oklahoma: Classified as a Category I Species of Special Concern (Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation).

Pennsylvania: Farmer et al. (2007) found an increase in various indices of counts of migrating Golden Eagles at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Pennsylvania between the periods of 1976-78 and 2001-03.

Tennessee: Classified as Threatened (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency).

New York: Now extirpated. Classified as Endangered (New York Department of Environmental Conservation).

Texas: Possibly declining. Ground transect surveys in winter and early spring from 1967 to 1970 suggested that numbers were stable (Glover and Heugly 1970), but the totals likely included migrant individuals. Ground surveys for eagle nests during 1980-82 in the Texas Panhandle and helicopter surveys of the Palo Duro-Caprock Canhyon complex and parts of Deaf Smith and Oldham Counties in 1983 by Rideout et al. (1984) led them to conclude that the Golden Eagle population was stable. An equivalent survey in 2005-2006 by Boal et al. (2008), using the same methods in most of the same area, suggested that the population of nesting Golden Eagles in the Texas Panhandle may have decline by 40-71% since 1983. The causes of the decline, if it is real, are not obvious, but most likely are related to changes in prey abundance.

Washington: Classified as a Species of Concern and as a State Candidate Species (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife).





















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